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THE GIFT OF OSIRIS

LOCATION DESCRIPTIONS:

3500 BC

tWay
 

tWay which is now called Egypt stretched from the Mediterranean Sea to the north along the Nile to Elephantine (which today is called Aswan) to the South.  The west and east boundaries were those of the high desert on either side of the Niles fertile land.

The Nile River

The Nile River

The Nile which rose as the White Nile from Lake Victoria in Uganda and Blue Nile from the mountains of Ethiopia, was the source of wealth to the country running over 4,000 miles along its entire length.  The Nile contrary to most rivers flows south to north and as the wind blows north to south, you could travel by sea using the river flow and sail in the opposite direction.  Water from the Nile was used directly for drinking and bathing as well as to fill wells.

The Nile was crucial for farming because it left a layer of nutrients from the silt when the Nile flooded and then receded in its annual inundation.  It was the floodplain which was first used for agriculture, but later this was extended by irrigation further inland.  Planting and harvesting follows the annual flooding, planting begins in September or October with crops of emmer (a type of wheat), barley and flax.  Cattle and poultry were also bred along the Nile.

The Nile River

The Nile River

The Low Dessert either side of the flood plain was used to hunt wild animals and bury the dead.  Whilst the High Dessert had several mines for calcite, gold, copper, amethyst, cornelian and diorite.  Many Oasis’s existed in the desert and were used to grow valuable crops like dates and grapes. 

The Oasis’s was also used occasionally to exile prisoners.
tWay which means two countries was divided into Ta-Mehu (Lower tWay) and Ta-Shemau (Upper tWay).  Each of these countries was divided into septs or districts each with a governor called a nomareh put in power by a Pharaoh.  The Pharaoh was an absolute ruler and it was an inherited title passed within a ruling family.

In 3500 DC Ta-Mehu had 20 septs and the principal cities were Giza, Heliopolis, Sais, Rosetta, Medis, Tanis a port and Memphis the capital.

Ta-Shemau was devided into 22 septs whose principal cities were Armana, Asyat, Abyclot, Coptos, Thebes, Luxor, Esna, Edfu, Asswan and El-Kab the capital.

There was no currency and scribes recorded daily information from tax collectors and recorded these on papyrus (a form of paper made like a mat by laying strips of cyperus, papyrus, plant stems across each other and softening them in water then pounding them into a page.  The practice goes back 5000 BC.) Tax collectors calculated taxes using a numbering system of divisions or fractions such as 1/2 or 3/4 .  They were written in hieroglyphs a early writing form, using notations.  In fractions 1 was represented be a open mouth and five would be thus 1/5 would be represented by   Taxes were paid on goods, food, metals, beasts or work.  A labour tax was mandatory each year of one period specified by the Pharaoh for each person in tWay, but this could be paid by rich people by using their servants.
 
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The Nile River

The Nile River

Trade was widespread and merchants travelled regularly to Cyprus, Crete, Greece, Eblan (which was from the red Sea to Northern Syria), Phoenicia (now Lebanon), Mesopotamia (now Iraq) and Palestine (now Israel).  The goods purchased were leopard skins, giraffe tails, monkeys, cattle, ivory, ostrich feathers, eggs, gold, punt (source of incense), cedars, oils, ugents and horses.

Medicine was common place and doctors performed surgery, set bones, prescribed medicines and had fairly good success rates of treating patients using many of the herbs still being used today.
Family life was not dissimilar to many households in the early part of the twentieth century.  The father was responsible for generating the wealth the mother for running the household.  Children of the upper classes attended formal school to become scribes or trained to be an officer in the Army.  Poorer children became apprentices to their father as craftsmen or worked in the fields as farm labourers.  Children stayed with the family until marriage men at about 20 and girls at about 15.

Dress in tWay was fairly simple with white linen being worn by both men and women.  Men wore a kilt tied at the waist or fastened with a buckle.  Women a sheath dress falling from the breast to the ankle.  Children and people exercising wore no cloths and went naked.  Footwear was restricted to sandals made from papyrus and had a leather thong similar to modern day flip flops.  Hair was shaven from the head normally except during childhood when children kept a long braided side lock. 

Behind the Chephren Pyramid at sunset

Behind the Chephren Pyramid at sunset

Occasionally important people kept their hair long such as the Pharaoh Set.  Women who were from the upper classes often wore elaborate high wigs with intricate patterns of jewellery.  Jewellery was worn by both sexes e.g. earrings, bracelets, anklets, ring and necklaces.

Personal hygiene was important and people bathed, wore cosmetics, used oils, creams, eye paint, lipstick and perfume.  The colours were not subtle green, black and vivid reds.

Homes varied dependent upon the wealth of the occupants.  Houses were made normally in clay bricks with a few rooms.  A typical middle class workman would have a small court yard facing onto a narrow street.  It would have windows with latticework to keep out the heat and cold.  Steps at the rear of the house would lead to a flat roof on which the family often slept.  All homes had a kitchen with a cylindrical clay oven for cooking and used a two handed pottery saucepan as the main cooking utensil.

Furniture was spartan, a low three legged stool used as a floors were uneven with a leather or woven rush seat.  Tables which were low to the floor are common.  The tWay bed was a wooden frame, with the legs carved in those of animal shapes and wooden rush mat used as the springs.  At the head of the bed were a wooden or stone headrest and a footboard at the other end.  All the household goods were stored in wooden boxes or rush baskets.  Food was stored in clay pottery.
The staple food of tWay was bread made from barley and emmer wheat.  The main drink was beer for the lower classes and wine for the upper classes.  Fruits and vegetables were grown by most families in irrigated gardens and were varied figs, dates, plums, grapes, watermelon, beets, radishes, lettuce, sweet onions, beans, chick peas and garlic.  Meat, fish and fowl were plentiful from the domestic herds, wild game from the lower desert and fish from the Nile.

The tWay population had leisure time particularly in the upper classes.  Formal banquets were held with professional dancers, musicians played musical instruments (flutes, trumpet, clarinet, harps. Lyres, tambourines and drums) and songs were sung and stories told.  Food and drink were always an integral part of any banquet.

Outdoor sports were popular hunting, fishing and fowling using the bow and arrow, a double barbed spear and thrown stick used respectively.  Pets were common dogs and cats with the occasional monkey for the wealthy.

About five percent of the population enjoyed reading in the quite of their homes and played board games, the most popular being sonnet.  Children had toys such as balls and dolls and played pretend games just like they have in every century.

 

Palestine

Palestine was not a cohesive country and consisted of a series of cities each with its own ruling structure and laws in 3500 BC.

 

Jericho

Jericho is five miles west of the Jordan River and twenty miles east of Jerusalem. Jericho like the Jordan River lies 1,000 feet below sea level which is the lowest lying land on earth.


Jericho City of Palms

Jericho City of Palms

About half a mile northwest of Jericho is a large spring of water called Ein es-Sultan which means “The Sultans Spring” in Arabic. The ever flowing spring, is the largest spring in the Jordan valley. In the biblical period large groves of date palms were grown around the spring and Jericho was often called “The City of Palm Trees”. The spring also forms a pool and using irrigation other traditional crops of wheat fields and figs were grown.

The Sultan's Spring

The Sultan's Spring

Jericho’s history dates back to around 11,000BC and the Natafian culture and the city went through many desertions and rebuilding over the centuries. As the various houses crumbled from each of the cultures which inhabited Jericho a mound was formed. On this mound which was over 20 feet high around 3500BC a new city was built. The city was reported to have been built in a grid pattern with clean streets as rubbish was thrown outside the walls. Houses were built with mainly clay bricks although some stone was used. Jericho had a wall with at least one tower surrounding the city.

Diagram of Jericho wall

Diagram of Jericho's City walls


Diagram of Jericho wall

Remains of Jericho's City walls

There were both weapons and tools made of bronze which is a mixture of copper and tin. From the pottery found at Jericho they were clearly in touch with Mesopotamia (Iraq) and TWay (Egypt).
The whole of the city was completely destroyed around 2300BC by invaders burning the city to the ground. In “The Gift of Osiris” this event is changed to 3500BC for the imagined invasion of Jericho by the Pharaoh set of Ta-Shemau.

 

Jerusalem

Jerusalem is the capital of Israel and dates back to 4000BC. It is approximately 48 square miles (125 square kilometres). Located between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea in the Judea Mountains it is home to over three quarter million people.

The Wailing Wall

The Wailing Wall

Jerusalem

Jerusalem

The old wall city is divided into four quarters; Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Armenian. Amongst the many sites of significance are the Temple mount, the Western Wall, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque.

Very little is known of the culture, city and people in 3500BC even though ceramic evidence indicates its occupancy in about 4000BC. Therefore, the descriptions by the author are based on similar locations like Jericho which are better documented.

Today the city is seen by many as riddled with tension between the majority Jewish population and the minority Muslim population which is growing rapidly. The city with its crowed streets is still however worth a visit. Even if you ignore the political significance and religious sites, the city has museums, art galleries, the Jerusalem symphony Orchestra, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, the Jerusalem Music Centre, theatres and the annual Jerusalem Film Festival.

 

Bethlehem

Bethlehem which means “House of Meat” in Arabic and “House of Bread” in Hebrew is part of Palestine and is located in the central West Bank 6 miles (10kilometers) North of Jerusalem. It was the birth place of Jesus of Nazareth and the location where David was crowned King of Israel.

Map of Bethlehem

Map of Bethlehem

There are four references to Bethlehem before 1400BC when it appears in the Amana Letters it is imagined it was little more than a collection of connected farms rather than the city or village in 3500BC.

In the biblical era it is known as the “City of David” as the second King of Israel was born there and crowned king by Samuel in the city. The Bible refers to Bethlehem as the location where Rachel died and was buried. The Tomb of Rachel now stands at the entrance to Bethlehem.

In the Gospel of Luke Jesus parents travel from their home in Nazareth for the census of AD6 to Bethlehem and Jesus is born. This is a widely accepted version of events but several other versions exist and in the “The Gift of Osiris” Horus is also born in the location.

During the Islamic rule and the Crusades, Bethlehem changed hands several times in the period 637 to 1250 from Muslim to Christian and vice versa.

Bethlehem

Bethlehem

There after followed a period from 1517 when the Ottoman Empire controlled Bethlehem and Muslims and Christians were segregated into separate communities. The Ottoman control was broken from 1831 to 1841 by the Egyptian’s but returned to Ottoman control again in 1841.

In the Twentieth century it was administered by the British from 1920 to 1948, but in 1947 became part of the United Nations Assembly resolution to partition Palestine. Jordan annexed Bethlehem in 1948 during the Arab-Israel war but in 1967 during the Six Day War Israel took control of the city. In 1995 Israel withdrew from Bethlehem and the Palestine National Authority took control of the city.

The major attraction in Bethlehem is the “Church of Nativity” which stands in the centre of the city and is part of Manger Square. The church stands directly over the location of a cave where Jesus is said to have been born.

The Church of Nativity

The Church of Nativity

The City has a bustling handicraft industry making olive wood carvings, mother of pearl ornaments, stone and marble cuttings, textiles, furniture and furnishings.

The author has visited Bethlehem several times and found the place lacking in dignity, particularly near the Church of Nativity considering its significance to Christianity. He would still recommend a visit to anybody who visits Israel just for the bustling market places.

 

Nazareth
Nazareth

Nazareth

Nazareth dates back 9000 years to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic Era, as archaeological findings were found at Kfar HaHoresh about two miles (3kms) from Nazareth revealing a funeral burial and cult centre. Nazareth according to the Gospel of Luke was the home of Jesus, both of his conception and subsequently after they returned from Egypt. There is a much debate about the name Nazareth of whether it is derived from the Hebrew “ne-ler” meaning branch or from the Arabic “an-Nasira and Jesus, Yasu meaning “those who follow Jesus”.

Nazareth was of little significance in biblical times and therefore made a perfect location for Jesus to be brought up, without being detected by those who wished to do him harm. In the novel “The Gift of Osiris” Isis, also selects this location as a place to seek refuge during the purge of Herut of Jerusalem.

Nazareth today is located in a natural bowl which is up to 1050 feet above sea level (320meters) some 16 miles (25kms) from the Sea of Galilee and approximately five and a half miles (9kms) from the Mount Tabor. The city is mainly Arabic with Muslims, exceeding a significant Christian minority as well as Jews.

Click here to view the location
on Google Maps

Visiting Nazareth you will find is a mixture of religious sites and a multi cultural city very typical of life in the Middle East. The most significant site is the Basilica of the Annunciation which was believed to be the home of Mary where the Angel Gabriel announced Mary was to bear the Son of God. Other sites include St. Joseph’s Church, the site of Joseph’s workshop and St. Gabriel’s Church of Annunciation, the Orthodox Church believe this to be the location of Mary’s annunciation. The Nazareth Village which is a reproduction of a Roman Village in biblical times and actors dress up as Romans is also worth a visit. The Old City and Market is the heartbeat of modern Nazareth and if full of winding roads, bazaars and shops where the traveller can sit at a coffee shop and soak up the atmosphere.

In book two in ”The Gift of Osiris” modern Nazareth as part of modern Israel is used as setting for the meeting of David York and Gino Bellini at the Marriott Nazareth and later at the Sicily Restaurant
and Pizza.

 

Libya Cyrene
Cyrene Shore

Cyrene Shore

Atlantis is an often quoted large island that existed in the Atlantic Ocean and is reported by the Egyptians from 9,570 BC according to the Atlantean Script that Solon a Greek Statesman brought with him from a visit to Sais, Egypt and Libyan Pharaoh Amasis II 570-564 BC.  This reality was created into a myth around 2575 BC, simply for the lack of evidence and avoids the Truth of Life, that Atlanteans actually existed and travelled abroad creating cities and using technology, which was copied by other civilisations.  Amongst the early Atlantean cities created was Cyrene in Libya, which was later colonised by the Greeks when Battus followed the historical journey of the earlier Atlantean’s.

Cyrene is positioned at the start of the Akhdar Mountains looking out in the direction of the Mediterranean Sea in a green fertile valley with a forest on the hill above.  The modern day city is of about three quarters of a mile (1.2 kilometres) by six tenths of a mile (1 Kilometre) in size and has grown together with the nearby village of Shahut and the agricultural fields which surround both locations.

In the centre of Cyrene on the agora (the town square) the Tomb of Battus is located and is believed to be the same site at which the Atlanteans also had their city’s centre of government.  The current main attractions are the Temple of Zeus and Temple of Apollo, from the Greek period of occupation.

Temple of Zeus Cyrene

Temple of Zeus Cyrene

Cyrene ruins

Cyrene ruins

Present Day

Rome, Italy
 
The Colloseum

The Colloseum

The Spanish Steps

The Spanish Steps

The Trevi Fountain

The Trevi Fountain

Rome is both the largest city, 496 square miles (1285 square kilometres) and it’s the most populated (with 2.7 million residents) in Italy. Located in the central western area of the Italian Peninsula on the Tiber River, it is also the capital of Italy.

Located within Rome is also the Vatican State which was created in 1929.
Rome has been variously called ‘Capital of the World’ and the ‘Eternal City’, because of its huge influence on western Civilization in the Roman Empire period, religiously through the Pope, art and education.  For anybody who has never visited Rome it is a must and is one of the firm favourite cities of the author, who has visited it several times.

The city is so packed with things to see, it is difficult to know where to start describing its buildings and the vibrant, bustling city and its people.
Undoubtedly people start with Coliseum from Ancient Rome, the largest amphitheatre built in the Roman Empire. Then there is the Roman Forum, the Parthenon, the Circus Maximus, Arch of Constantine, Baths of Caracella and Pyramid of Cestius and many more.

In Medieval times many other buildings were erected including the Basilica of San Paolo Fouri le Mura, the Church of Santa Maria in Trasteve, the tower of Torre delle Milize and the staircase leading to Santa Maria in Ara Coeli.

During the Renaissance and Baroque Periods, Michelangelo designed the Pizza del Campidoglio and Palazzo Senatorio. Opulent dwelling were built by wealthy Roman families around the city. The major squares such as the Pizza Novona, Pizza di Spagna, Pizza Venezia and others were also built. But perhaps the most famous landmark of the period is the fountain, Fontana di Trevi by Nicola Salvi.

After 1870, Rome entered its Neoclassic, period and building such as “The Monument to Vittorio Emmanuelle II was built and the Piazza del Popolo.

Public parks and gardens form a large part of the Rome city, the majority being gardens surrounding villas built by the Italian Aristocracy with perhaps Villa Borghese being the best example.

Rome is known for its talking statues. These are the ancient statues which have become popular soap boxes for people to air their political views such as Pasquino and Marforio are the most famous.

Rome produces nearly seven percent of Italy’s gross national product about 121 billion US dollars in 2005 (94million euro’s) and has one of the lowest employment rates of any European capital. Commerce is dominated by industries such as IT, aerospace, defence, telecommunications and banking as well as the very obvious tourism.
Rome forms a peripheral setting in the novel "The Gift of Osiris" as the main location in Italy is the Vatican.

The Vatican
 

The Vatican is officially “Stato della Citta de Vaticano” or translated the “State of the City of the Vatican” which consists of a walled enclave in the city of Rome. It consists of only 110 acres (44 hectares) and has a population of about 800 people.

Map of the Vatican City

Map of the Vatican City

The Vatican which was established in 1929 is headquarters of the Catholic Church which has about 1.2 billion adherents around the world. The state is ruled by the Bishop of Rome – the Pope, and is the smallest state in the world.

Within the Vatican covering nearly half of its territory are the Vatican Gardens which were established in the Renaissance and Baroque era. St Peter’s Basilica, the Apostolic Palace (the Pope’s official residence), the Sistine Chapel, the museums with St Peter’s Square provide the most important architecture within the Vatican. The Pope resides in the Papal Apartments of the Papal Palace just off St. Peter’s Square and it is here where all state business is conducted.

The Pope is effectively an elective monarch and exercises both legislative and judicial power over the State of the Vatican, he is therefore an absolute monarchy. The Vatican is currently not a member of the United Nations. A body of Cardinals appointed by the Pope for a period of five years called the Pontifical Commission for Vatican City State draft all legislation and have executive powers. Foreign policy is entrusted to the “Holy see’s Secretariat of State and the diplomatic service”. The Apostolic Chamber administers the property in the Vatican and organizes the election of the Pope when a vacancy occurs.

The Pontifical Swiss Guard founded in 1506 is the personal body guard of the Pope and has only 134 guards. Only Swiss Catholic male citizens can apply.

St. Peter's Square

St. Peter's Square

Inside the Vatican

Inside the Vatican

The Gendarmerie Corps of the Vatican City State acts as a police force and is responsible for public order, law enforcement, crowd control, traffic control and criminal investigation.

The Vatican has no military forces and is protected by the Italian armed forces.

The Vatican’s economy is based largely in tourism selling stamps, mementos, and admission fees, sale of publications, mosaics and uniforms. The Vatican also conducts worldwide financial activities through its own bank, Isituto per le opere di Religione (the Vatican Bank) it uses the Euro as its currency but issues its own coins.

Whilst the population of the Vatican is about 800 they employ 3,000 lay people who live outside the Vatican who are nearly all Italian Catholics. There is no official language but legislative documents, ATMs and other official documents are issued in Latin. Italian is the normal everyday language of workers except the Swiss Guard who use German.

Citizenship of the Vatican is granted based on an appointment in the Vatican and normally ceases when the person leaves that appointment.
The Vatican has no airport but does have a heliport, a railway at St. Peter’s Railway Station and some limited roads as the country is very small.

The Vatican has its own modern telephone system, broadband, controls its own internet and radio. It also has the Vatican Pharmacy, Post Office, Postal System, News paper and Television Service.

The Vatican has no sports field or stadiums but has fielded a national team for both football and cricket.

The Vatican is used as a backdrop to the meeting between the Pope and the Cult leader Gino Bellini and Cardinal Castellano in the Second Book of the “Gitf of Osiris” by the author.

Inside the Vatican

Inside the Vatican

St. Peter's Square with tourists gathered

St. Peter's Square with tourists gathered

 

New York, USA
 
Manhattan skyline

Manhattan skyline

Metlife Building

Metlife Building

Click here to view the location
on Google Maps

 

New York is the most populous city in the United States with a population of 8.3 million and covers an area of three hundred square miles (790 square kilometres). The greater metropolitan area has a population of 22.2 million and is 6,720 square miles (17,400 square kilometres)

New York vies with London as the financial capital of the world, is home to the New York Stock Exchange and Wall Street. Amongst the Iconic buildings and locations known worldwide are The Statue of Liberty, Times Square, Broadway, China Town, Central Park, The Empire State Building, Ellis Island, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Bronx Zoo and Fifth and Madison Avenue. Annual events such as the Halloween Parade in Greenwich Village, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, the free performances in Central Park at Summerstage and the Tribeca Film festival, all help attract over 47 million visitors a year to this vibrant city. 

New York is used as a location in Book Four by the author for David York’s base on the East Coast where he meets with Pat Wiseman at the Algonquin Hotel.

The Blue Bar inside the Algonquin

The Blue Bar inside the Algonquin

Located in the heart of New York at West 44th Street, the Algonquin has been an iconic centre for the literary elite since it opened its doors in 1902. The Round Table which is a group of twenty something’s formed in 1919 founded the New Yorker magazine and influenced writers like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway.

The Round Table inside the Algonquin

The Round Table inside the Algonquin

 

Algonquin Hotel

Del Posto restaurant
- exterior

Today the hotel still retains much of its appeal, from the oak panelled lobby of an Edwardian era, with brass bells on each table, to the Oak Room’s rich panelling and warm lighting, it remains the authors favourite New York hotel.

The restaurant Del Posto at 85 10th avenue is used by the author as the meeting place between David York and Gino Bellini.

The Del Posto has been built to have an airy feel but retain an Italian flavour by using towering columns and tall curtained windows in a darkly glowing room created by the dark wood and golden decor. Space had been provided and many critics think the restaurant has lost the intimacy of the Italian Bistro, but the author likes the atmosphere. The tinkling piano music in the background he found pleasing not distracting and the space between tables logical.

Algonquin Hotel

Algonquin Hotel
- exterior

Click here to view the location
on Google Maps

Del Posto restaurant interior

Del Posto restaurant
- interior

Del Posto restaurant interior

Del Posto restaurant
- interior

St Patrick’s Cathedral located on the east side of Fifth Avenue between 50th and 51st streets, in midtown Manhattan facing the Rockefeller Centre is used as a location by the Cult to deliver the ‘Coffin of Destiny’ to the Catholic Church in Book Four.

St. Patrick's Chapel interior

St. Patrick's Chapel
- interior

St. Patrick's Chapel interior

St. Patrick's Chapel
- exterior

Los Angeles, California, USA
 

Los Angeles nicknamed the ‘City of Angels’, is the largest city in California, with a population close to four million people and is close to five hundred square miles (1,290 kilometres) in size.

Sunset Strip Los Angeles

Sunset Strip Los Angeles

With Hollywood located in its boundaries it is known as the ‘Entertainment Capital of the World’ with its innovations in the cinema, television, video games, and recorded music. The city is also a world centre for business and was ranked third in the world behind New York and Tokyo with a gross metropolitan product (GMP) of $831 billion on 2008.  

The author has long regarded the city as one of his favourite places and has visited it many times over the years. It forms the backdrop in Book Two in "The Gift of Osiris" as the meeting place between David York and Bill O’Brien, his daughter Pat Wiseman and her husband Senator George Wiseman at the Chateau Marmont.

Walkway inside Chateau Marmont

Walkway inside Chateau Marmont

Tucked away in the lush enclave that hovers above the Sunset Strip the Chateau Marmont is a famous destination for the rich and the famous. The hotel has been a fixture in the Hollywood scene since the 1930’s, when Harry Cohn the original head of Columbia pictures famously said “If you must get in trouble do it at the Chateau Marmont”. The hotel is located in a garden oasis above the Sunset Strip and was modelled after a castle in the French countryside with a Gothic Interior exuding bohemian flair. At the Marmont as you almost feel you are whisked back to the Hollywood of old and will meet Errol Flynn or Carol Lombard in the cocktail bar.

 

Click here to view the location
on Google Maps

Chataeu Marmon

Chataeu Marmont

Bungalow Chataeu Marmont

Bungalow Chataeu Marmont


 

Boston, USA
 
Bungalow Chataeu Marmont

Downtown Boston at dusk

Boston often called the ‘Capital of New England’ is one of the largest metropolitan areas in America with a population of 4.5 million in Greater Boston and 7.5 million in the community region.

Founded by Puritan colonists from England in 1630 in the Shawmut Peninsula, it was one of the locations which sparked the American Revolution with the Boston Tea Party.

With its many Universities, the city’s economy is based on research, electronics, engineering, finance and biotechnology.

Boston’s Freedom Trial is a 2.5 miles ( 4 kilometres) red brick walking trail which covers some sixteen national treasures such

Bungalow Chataeu Marmont

Omni Parker Hotel Lobby

as, Boston Common, Massachusetts State House, Park Street Church, Granary Burying Ground, Kings’ Chapel and Burying Ground, First Public School Site and Ben Franklin Statue, Site of the Old Corner Bookstore, Old South Meeting House, Old State House, Boston Massacre Site, Faneuil Hall, Paul Revere House, Old North Church, Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, USS Constitution and Charlestown Navy Yard and the Bunker Hill Monument.

As well as the historic trail there are many other things to do in Boston with a wide diversity of cultural events in theatre, music, film and the arts.

The author has visited Boston several times particularly in the 1980’s and 1990’s when he visited Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) whilst developing expert systems for process control and business applications. Boston has two locations that are used in Book Four of ‘The Gift of Osiris’, the iconic Omni Hotel and King’s Chapel.

Omni Parker restaurant famous for cream pie

Omni Parker Restaurant -
famous for cream pie


The Omni Parker Hotel is on 60 School Street in Boston and built in the nineteenth century. The bronze sculpted doors at the entrance beacon the traveller into America’s oldest continuously- operating hotel, which opened in 1855. The hotel now with modern amenities is decorated tastefully and blends of reds and gold fabric, light wooden furniture and the high curved ceilings in the lobby with chandeliers give you the feeling of Victorian luxury. Situated on the freedom trait it is often used by visitors as the last stop to a historical tour of the city.

 

 

 

Boston Kings Chapel

Kings Chapel

Boston Kings Chapel Cemetary

Kings Chapel
- interior

Boston Kings Chapel Cemetary

Kings Chapel Cemetary

Kings Chapel was the first Anglican Church built in New England in 1688 and was founded by the Royal Governor Sir Edmund Adros in the reign of King James II. The original construction was wooden but in 1749 a stone structure designed by Peter Harrison was built around the existing church. The wooden church was then disassembled and removed through the windows of the stone church. The whole wooden church was then shipped to Novia Scotia where it was reconstructed as St. John’s Anglican Church. The stone church is located on Tremont and School Streets in Boston.

 

   






















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